Morton of Pitmilly resort sign

Posted Posted in Signage, Wood

Eilidh from Morton of Pitmilly Countryside Resort needed a new sign post to direct her visitors around the site and asked if I could help. She’d seen a laser engraved wooden sign that a neighbour had commissioned, thought it looked very smart and was interested in something similar.

Sign design

Eilidh wanted a central post to stand outside reception with 14 fingers. She gave me a list of what was to go on each finger and which were to point left or right so I’d know which way round to engrave them.

Eilidh wanted a clear font, so I chose Arial and created a proof to match the wooden finger dimensions that she wanted. We decided that the text would be 70mm from the edge that would be inserted into the uprights. This would make sure that the text on all the fingers would be the same distance from the post, whichever side of the uprights they were on.

If I made the text 200 point, it fitted the finger shapes perfectly, and even the longer lines of text fitted the fingers comfortably. I sent Eilidh the proof and she was happy with it.

Wood to last the test of time

Eilidh contacted Frazer from FAR Cabinet Makers about the wood for the sign. As it was to be located outdoors, it was important to select the right wood. Oak always costs more, but it’s very beautiful and takes laser engraving very well. After some thought, Eilidh knew it was the right choice and would give the look that she wanted.

Engraving the oak fingers

When the oak was ready, I invited Eilidh to visit the workshop while I engraved the first finger. She had been considering colourfilling to make the text on the sign stand out, but I was convinced that this would not be required. If she saw the engraving and how it looked, she could decide for herself.

Eilidh and her mum were fascinated to see the laser at work, and completely agreed that the engraving was deep and dark enough to be clear. They picked up the fingers when they were all finished and their handyman assembled the sign and treated it for weather protection.

Have you got a product you’d like to develop but aren’t sure how? Contact us or ask for a quote.

Oak signs for The Green Lodge Aviemore

Posted Posted in Signage, Wood

Helen asked me if I could make two oak signs for her holiday cottage, The Green Lodge, in Aviemore. It was about to open, and she thought that signs would be lovely finishing touches that would also help visitors to find it.

Making up proofs

Helen wanted two signs, a smaller one to sit by the front door, and a larger one to sit at the turn off to the house. She had a logo that she wanted on both signs. Helen decided that an arrow on the larger one would be helpful too.

She emailed me a black and white logo in PDF format which was perfect.  I could rescale it to two sizes , one for each sign, without loss of image quality.

Helen contacted Frazer at FAR Cabinet Makers to specify the wood and sizes for the signs. Then I prepared some proofs, locating the logos centrally within the shapes of the wood. The sizes I could engrave the logos was dictated by the width of the logo. It’s important to have enough white space around artwork so that it doesn’t look crammed in.

To make sure it was clear, Helen wanted the arrow on the larger sign to be long, sitting across the width of the sign. After she saw the proof, she decided on a smaller one in the bottom left corner. This was  definitely the right decision. While still very clear, the arrow was much more subtle and didn’t dominate the sign.

After a couple of proofs, Helen was happy and I engraved the signs.

Frazer Reid from @farcabinetmakers sanding down the Green Lodge house signs

Posted by The Green Lodge Aviemore on Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Finishing the signs

Helen came round to pick up the signs after I’d engraved them. She took them to Frazer’s workshop where he gave them a light sand and varnished them to protect them from the elements.  She loved watching the process, and made the film above.

Both photos were taken by her after the signs were installed. She’s delighted with them and they really suit the property.

 

Have you got a product you’d like to develop but aren’t sure how? Contact us or ask for a quote.

In/out boards for St Leonards school

Posted Posted in Signage, Wood

Nicole’s husband is the Housemaster at Ollerenshaw House, one of the houses where boarding boys live at St Leonards school in St Andrews. It was completely refurbished last summer.

All three boarding houses have in/out boards where the pupils indicate their location. Nicole and Rupert didn’t want to put up the old in/out board in the the redecorated house as it was functional but not beautiful.  They wanted something special, a piece of furniture that would look the part. They also wanted door signs for the boys’ rooms and keyrings for each room too.

A mutual friend gave her Nicole my name, and she visited the workshop to discuss ideas.

In/out board specification

Nicole had clear ideas of how the two boards with up to 20 names each were to function.

She wanted small wood ‘clickers’, pieces with the boys’ names on them. These would slide along channels under  a header inscribed with the following locations: Home, Campus, Town, Trip and Golf. She also wanted a picture of Ollerenshaw House at the top of each board if possible.

I showed Nicole some engraved wooden signs that I’d engraved for Jupiter Artland and The National Library of Scotland. She also saw sample badges that I’d cut and engraved from 6mm oak for Cambo Estate weddings team. Their size was exactly what she was looking for, and she loved the oak finish. I also explained to Nicole the maximum sizes of board the laser can accommodate.

Working with a local furniture maker

Engraving the house artwork, header text and making the clickers was possible for me. Making the boards was not something I’m set up for however. So I gave Nicole FAR Cabinet Makers‘s contact details.  Frazer is a furniture maker near Crail. I’ve worked with him on several projects including signage for Cambo Estate.

Getting to work

Nicole liked our ideas and quotes, and was keen to get to work. She hoped to have the boards made as soon as possible. She send me a list of the boys’ names and year groups and I created proofs for the clickers and the header boards.

Frazer delivered one board and the two strips for location text and two waney edged pieces for the house artwork. It was really useful to have the board in pieces to work on and I could double check measurements and fit.

All the pieces were solid oak except for the backing board. It was oak veneered mdf which made it easier and cheaper to make.

I tweaked the clicker sizes so they’d sun smoothly in the grooves that Frazer had made, making them 65 x 30mm. He kindly planed my oak planks down from 7.5mm to 5mm thick. Just as well I’d checked or they would have been too thick!

Then I cut and engraved the clickers and location strips and treated the clickers with antique oil.

Installing the in/out boards

Frazer  sanded, finished and assembled both boards and installed them in Ollerenshaw House last week. They look great, and Rupert, Nicole and the boys are really pleased with them. They really are pieces of furniture and a joy to use.

 

I’m going to write a separate blog about how I engraved the Ollerenshaw House artwork, and about the keyrings and door signs.

For obvious reasons, I’ve blanked out the name in the top photo as I can’t show pictures where any names can be read.

 

Have you got a product you’d like to develop but aren’t sure how? Contact us or ask for a quote.

Branded wooden sign for selfie bug

Posted Posted in Signage, Wood

Craig Hutchison of Vollood Hair and Beauty in Dunfermline has a lovely old VW Beetle covered in Vollood branding. He wanted a piece of wood engraved with his logo to sit in front of the roof rack as a finishing touch.  Vollood Hair and Beauty is Dunfermline’s only vegan hair and beauty salon. Craig fitted it out with a smart yet sustainable vibe using lots of reclaimed wood, and the sign matched this look perfectly.

As part of his social media campaign, Craig planned to park the bug at different places around the town. People could win vouchers if they spotted it and posted selfies with the car.

Craig visited the workshop with the wood and we planned to complete the job while he waited.

Adjusting the logo artwork

Before he arrived, Craig sent me a vector file of his logo so I could make sure it was right for what I needed.  It was. Vector files are really flexible as I can rescale them and make customised tweaks to suit what the customer wants. In this case, Craig wanted the logo to fit the long, thin piece of wood he’d brought.

For clarity, Craig wanted the logo to be as big as possible. As the wood is narrowest in the middle and the logo is widest in the middle, I scaled it so that there’d be a 10mm gap between the engraving and the top and bottom edges of the wood at the narrowest point. He thought of removing ‘Hairdressing and Beauty’ and make ‘Vollood’ bigger, but decided not to in the end.

Vollood sign on the laser

Engraving the wood

For stability, I usually sit large pieces of wood in the bottom of the machine after removing the knife bed.

Craig wanted the logo engraved as deep and dark as possible. He loved watching the machine engrave his logo and how the wood grain stood out clearly in the engraved areas.

He took the wood home to treat it for outdoor display outdoors. After he mounted it on the car, he posted photos on Facebook.

 

Have you got a product you’d like to develop but aren’t sure how? Contact us or ask for a quote.

Fish and Frites festival menu boards

Posted Posted in Signage, Stainless steel, Wood

Sarah and Jordan from Fish & Frites were preparing to take their gorgeous blue Citroen mobile food van to The Edinburgh Festival Fringe for the first time. They wanted to have a flexible menu board and find a way to add branding to their batter shield and asked if I could help.

Wooden menu board

Sarah’s van has an area to the right of the serving hatch that was ideal for locating a menu board.  Something flexible was needed that could be altered for different occasions.

She has the idea of a board with interchangeable slats that different menu items could be engraved onto, and liked the idea that they could also be reversible to use both sides of the wood as only one side would be visible at any time. They also wanted something that they can use not just at the Festival, but afterwards at other festivals and events.

As Sarah has a joiner in the family, she asked him to make something simple and interesting. Then I could engrave each slat.

When the slats were ready, Sarah brought them round. She chose a font and we set up the artwork together to make sure she was happy with everything. After she approved a final proof, I engraved and varnished each slat.

Fish & Frites wooden menu

Batter shield branding

This shield is a large piece of stainless steel bent at 90 degrees in the middle. It was added to the van give the cooking areas more protection from the weather. Sarah and Jordan thought it should also work hard to promote their business and wanted their logo engraved on it. Quite right too!

Fitting it into the machine was a challenge! When the engraved side sat in the machine, the other side (next to the ketchup bottles) had to hang out of the front during production.

As the logo was to appear in the centre of the front face, I had to scale the logo so that the engraved area would fit in the engraving bed. Part of the engraved side would be outside the engraving bed or be outside the machine entirely. 75mm diameter was the largest I could make it and Sarah was happy with that.

Finally, I had to make sure I engraved the logo the right way up!  I rotated the logo 90 degrees clockwise so it would be the right way up when the shield was mounted.

Once everything was ready, I painted the engraving area with Thermark metal marking paste, let it dry and engraved the logo. Thermark leaves a lovely matt black enamel mark that stands out and is weather proof and scratch resistant. Sarah and Jordan were delighted.

Fish & Frites stainless steel batter shield

Fish & Frites at the Edinburgh Festival

Fish & Frites van looks even smarter with its new features, and they cooked up a storm at Edinburgh’s Underbelly. Their fish & chips are some of the best I’ve ever had, so if you see them near you, don’t hesitate to try their delicious food!

 

Have you got a product you’d like to develop but aren’t sure how? Contact us or ask for a quote.

 

Other blogs that you might find helpful about food truck signage include Flahute Coffee Company signsOak sign for The Crepe Shack and Signs for The Cheesy Toast Shack.

Crail Castle Walkway panorama

Posted Posted in Signage, Wood

The Crail Preservation Society wanted to refresh the Crail Castle Walkway panorama showing landmarks on the opposite side of the Firth of Forth. The old one was printed and mounted in a box to protect it from the weather, but it hadn’t survived the elements in that exposed spot. This time, they wanted it engraved on a piece of wood to fit the location.

I love panoramas, so I was really excited about this project!

Converting the panorama artwork for engraving

Dennis wanted to use the artwork that had been used for the previous panorama. It had been created by artist Kurt Diggelman. It had to be modified as it was in colour and the laser can’t engrave in colour. Catriona of CatMac Design is a graphic designer who helps me out with things like this, and she worked with Dennis to a create black and white vector artwork conversion of Kurt’s image.

One of my concerns was whether the text would be easy to read without people having to bend down. To check this, I performed some test engraves of the smallest text and they worked better than I’d expected.

A piece of white oak

Dennis knew Frazer Reid of FAR Cabinet Makers, so he asked him about what wood would be best to use for this project. Not only did it have to look beautiful, but it had to be suitable for outdoor display in an exposed spot. Frazer suggested white oak, and supplied a beautifully prepared piece 1330 x 385mm and about an inch thick. The maximum width of the machine is 1340mm, so it was a snug fit!

Engraving the panorama detail

I used machine settings to make sure the detail of the text would be as clear as possible. Then I engraved the wood with maximum power for best possible contrast between the engravings and the wood. Dennis was delighted with the results. It’s hoped that the panorama will be installed this week in its new home.

 

Have you got a product you’d like to develop but aren’t sure how? Contact us or ask for a quote.