How does engraved wood look?

How does engraved wood look?

Karen Elwis of The Learning Cauldron became a friend through Fife Women in Business. She tutors students in English, German and French from her home. Recently, she asked if I could engrave a sign with her logo so that pupils would know where to come.

She had also been short listed as a finalist for the Perthshire Chamber of Commerce awards for 2018 and wanted the sign in place when the judges paid her a visit. This increased the urgency of the request considerably!

The Learning Cauldron logo

When Karen had her logo designed, she wanted it to look like as though it was written with chalk on a blackboard. The Learning Cauldron text is all white on a black background, except for the TLC letters which are all in chalk colours.

Laser engraving can’t be done in colour. The laser either engraves or doesn’t engrave, and the engraved surface of wood is a shade of brown. This is darker if the wood is darker and a higher power setting is used during engraving.

I suggested to Karen that there would be two ways of engraving her logo. It could be done so that the black square would be engraved and the letters unengraved. This would look closest to her logo. Otherwise, I could engrave the outline of the square which would be left engraved, and the text. This way, the logo would be recognisable with minimal  engraving. Both options would look great depending on what she preferred.

The Learning Cauldron oak sign
The engraved but unvarnished sign

What does engraved wood look like?

It was important that Karen knew what to expect. Most signs have small engraved areas like text. Karen’s logo was different to most that I’ve worked with as the engraved area would be much larger.

I showed Karen samples of how engraved oak would look. It’s such a beautiful wood with a lovely grain which would show through the engraving. Engraved areas would be slightly recessed into the wood, and growth rings of different densities would engrave to different depths. After engraving, varnish, stain or oil protect the wood, evening out and enhancing the engraved areas and improving the contrast between engraved and unengraved areas. You can see the difference it makes if you compare the picture above with the lead picture and video.

Karen was keen to have the sign looking as close to the logo as possible, so opted to have the square engraved.  She asked Frazer Reid of FAR Cabinet Makers to make the oak sign. He dropped it off at my workshop and I got to work.

This piece of oak was less dense than some I’ve worked with, and the engraving had a nice depth to it. And the wood grain rippled like a wave across the surface and this was pronounced in the engraving, enhancing interest in the area. As there was so much engraving, a lot of dust was created as it is a burning process, so I gave the sign a good rub with an old sock and then gave it a hoover for good measure to remove as much as possible. Karen was delighted with it and decided to varnish it herself.

Varnishing surprise

The challenge in this job arose unexpectedly as Karen finished her sign at home. While she was varnishing it, black specs from residual charred dust stuck to the brush and spread across the sign. It also contaminated the remainder of the pot of varnish I gave her from engraving my own house sign. Usually when engraved areas are small, the brush doesn’t contact the bottom of engravings and this problem doesn’t arise. In this case, a quarter to a third of the sign surface was engraved and  it was a problem that I hadn’t even thought of. I learned something new that day!

Karen rang me up and we chatted over how we could sort it out. She removed the affected varnish from the sign using solvent and sanding as she thought best. Once all of the engraved areas had one complete coat of varnish, it was sealed.

A splash of colour

Karen wanted her sign to look as close to her logo as possible, and enlisted her friend Claire Brownbridge’s expertise. She mixed some acrylic paint to match the chalk colours in the logo and painted the T, L and C. Varnishing the sign first made it easier to remove stray paint from unwanted areas. Then Karen completed the final coat with a clean brush and a new pot of varnish.

Karen’s sign is now proudly mounted outside her door for judges and pupils to admire!


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